Sewing for Placements

I’m beginning to forget what’s made it onto the blog and what hasn’t. I went on a photos spree a few weeks ago, but who knows what I’ve written about?

Today we’re going to go for my workhorse outfit. I’ve worn this pretty much once a week since May – when I finished the skirt – I don’t have a huge number of hospital outfits, so this is one of my standards.IMG_2094

In fact, the top was made as far back as January. It was the first Scout tee I made – I’ve made one since and am working on making more so I can branch out a bit in what I wear each day. These two tops really are staples of class clothes, and I feel good enough in them that I wear them outside class sometimes too.

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The fabric for the top was a fairly loose weave cotton from The Fabric Warehouse. I bought far too much of it, so am thinking maybe pyjama shorts for summer? It’s almost the season to be thinking about short pyjamas again… I love the textured weave, and at the time every fabric I was drawn to was for interest in the weave. I like that it’s a subtle interest to the top.

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I don’t think I’d realised quite how stripey the fabric was when I bought it. I love it now, but I was a bit worried I’d get the pyjama look wearing it out. I think the cut of the top doesn’t particularly help, but the fact that I wear it almost exclusively tucked into a skirt does.

So let’s talk about the skirt! I did a really good job on this skirt. It was a practising invisible zips deal, because they were not one of my skills (but now they are!). It was also a practising gathered skirts, because I was about to make bridesmaids skirts for my flatmate and wanted to test out what ratio to gather to. This is a ratio of 1 1/2: 1 skirt:waistband (more or less), which wound up a little narrower than I’d imagined, but actually turned out to be a very useful width for my hospital stuff. It’s just nice to have a slightly different silhouette to all my half-circle and circle skirts.

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I had forgotten how much hand-sewing I did on this, until I started taking photos. Look at this.

Waistband handstitched down. Zipper opening overcast. Hem catch stitched down. Look at that upper right photo – that’s the right side of the hem, to prove that it is completely invisible. I am surprised I had the patience, but you go past me! It’s really satisfying to wear something so nicely made, especially when I’m wearing it so often.

The skirt fabric is a lovely spongy rayon/polyester crepe also from The Fabric Warehouse, by the way, which I bought almost entirely for the colour (and in fact fought my sister over. She got the remnants). I do like that store – they have a lot of variety in their fabrics, mostly cheap, and good sales (but occasional, so you have to get in quick).

And for a bonus, my other workhorse clothing is the cardigan I often wear with it.

I don’t have any great photos of it, but this is a merino knit cardi made from the Plantain pattern. I was intending to use Jenna, as I’ve done before, but realised it would take some significant editing and actually starting with a t-shirt pattern and just slashing the front in half and adjusting the neckline would be closer to what I was thinking. I added a 2″ strip folded in half for the front band, and by some miracle not of my doing it hangs beautifully so you can’t see the attachment of the band on the inside. This is a perfect cardigan for my life, and I wear it all the time. Especially with the above hospital outfit. It’s super satisfying having such a normal, every day outfit that I’m so happy with and feel good every time I put on. Really, I just need two more like it…

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7 thoughts on “Sewing for Placements

  1. I made a cardy the same but I messed up and cut the band in the non stretchy direction so mine really doesn’t sit right. And then used up all the scraps so I can’t recut it 😦

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